ARC resources

The Academic Resource Center (ARC) at Concordia University Ann Arbor is an invaluable, free resource for students. Below we hear from various ARC student workers about their roles here on campus and what they do specifically to help fellow students with their academics.


Within the ARC, there are many different opportunities for students to receive assistance for any academic need. There are writing consultants, math drop-in tutors, general tutors (for a wide variety of classes), and supplemental instructors. To learn more about each of these resources, student workers from the ARC have been asked to explain their role on campus and the help they provide to any student that seeks it out.

Writing Consultant: Allie Milot (’21)

Describe your position:

Knowing how to write and communicate effectively is an extremely important skill. I get the chance to help students with all aspects of the writing process. Whether a student needs help brainstorming, formatting, editing, needs grammar, content, or organization assistance, I am just one of four writing consultants that is available to help. Each writing consultant is willing to sit down and work with any student with any writing issue that they have and we love to see each student grow as a writer. 

What hours do you work/when do other tutors like you work?

We work with the students individually on a drop-in basis throughout the week. Our drop-in hours change every semester and this semester we are available in the ARC Monday through Friday from 9:30am-10:30am, 11:00am-2:00pm and on Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday from 4:00pm-10:00pm, and on Wednesday from 6:00pm-10:00pm. There are also hours available at the north building in Room 125 on Thursday from 11:00am-12:30pm. 

Where do you meet students for tutoring sessions?

We meet students in the Writing Center in the Academic Resource Center located in the Zimmerman Library.

What do you like most about your position?

I like my position because I get to help students with something that I am truly passionate about – writing. I get to explain the importance of writing and how to make their own writing better.

Why do you see yourself and what you do as something valuable for students at Concordia?

Like I said above, communication through writing is an essential life skill for any person and I am able to help students cultivate those skills that they will be able to use even after they leave Concordia.

Supplemental Instruction: Rachel Turner (’21)

Describe your position:

Supplemental instructors lead group study sessions and provide extra help to a group of students. This way, it is less intimidating for students that may be too nervous to meet one-on-one with a tutor.

The general tutors meet with students one-on-one to provide extra help to a student who may be struggling in a class or to a student who just wants to solidify the information that they already know.

What hours do you work/when do other tutors like you work?

For supplemental instruction, I am in the ARC at least four hours a week to work with students. If I have any tutoring appointments, I will be in the ARC for more hours. The number of hours will fluctuate based on how many students sign up for tutoring in that particular week.

Where do you meet students for tutoring sessions?

Usually, I meet with students in the ARC, but if the rooms are occupied then I will meet with a student anywhere else in the library or even sometimes the CMAX. It all depends on what rooms are available and the resources that might be needed such as whiteboards, computers, etc.

What do you like most about your position?

I love being able to meet with students more than once and to see the confidence they have in their academic ability grow. It’s also really nice to alleviate some stress off of another student by helping with homework if needed, helping prepare for an exam, etc.

Why do you see yourself and what you do as something valuable for students at Concordia?

Tutoring services can oftentimes be quite expensive, so I love that Concordia offers tutoring to students for free. Tutoring and supplemental instruction are amazing resources available to students to solidify the information that they are learning in class.

Math drop-in: Morgan Altergott (’20)

Describe your position:

As a math tutor, I help students struggling or looking for guidance in their math classes. Together, we find solutions to their problems and look for ways to prevent them in the future. Because I have taken these classes before, I also offer advice to the students on how to succeed in the class. This could include being present in every class meeting, how to study for tests, how to complete homework, or simply how to accomplish specific types of problems in the course.

What hours do you work/when do other tutors like you work?

Personally, I work 6:30-9 p.m. on Monday and Wednesday nights. These were the easiest times for me, and they seem to be available times for most students. What is nice about my position is I can create when students come see me. Some tutors’ schedules vary week to week. My schedule, on the other hand, does not change each week throughout the semester.

Where do you meet students for tutoring sessions?

I meet my students in the ARC for tutoring. We use one of the open rooms in the back for our sessions.

What do you like most about your position?What I love most about my position is helping students reach their own potential. Math is not everybody’s strong suit, but most majors require students to take a math class at Concordia. These students usually come into sessions discouraged, and I am able to help them recognize their God given strengths. Together, we figure out how to use those gifts when working through problems. When a student finally understands something I am assisting them with, it is the best feeling in the world. 

Why do you see yourself and what you do as something valuable for students at Concordia?

The ARC is one of the most valuable resources on campus. College can be difficult and frustrating at times, and students need guidance to manage these emotions. Tutoring specifically is beneficial to any student. Whether they have a small question or are on the verge of failing a class, tutors are able to guide students and help ease their anxieties. I would recommend our services to every student on campus.

General Tutor: Hannah Rumsey (’22)

Describe your position:

I tutor for a few science classes including: medical microbiology, elements of general and biological chemistry, and anatomy and physiology I/II. I meet when scheduled with students. We work together to talk through the material and questions they bring. I often share tips on how I studied for exams and what things helped me in classes. 

What hours do you work/when do other tutors like you work?

I work in the evenings, and I come in when I am scheduled for appointments. I am not sure what time other tutors work, but if someone goes into the ARC and asks for tutoring they will set them up with a tutor based on availability. 

Where do you meet students for tutoring sessions?

I often meet with students in the ARC. But, I tutor a few students that live in my dorm. We often stay in our CA for the sessions. 

What do you like most about your position?

I personally love science, and I get excited any time someone wants to talk about it with me. I also really enjoy being able to talk with students and develop a personal relationship with them, as they learn more about topics we have a mutual interest in. 

Why do you see yourself and what you do as something valuable for students at Concordia?

I think that the ARC is a great place for students to get help if they are struggling with a class, or just want to stay on top of material. I also think coming in for tutoring is a great way to make connections with other people on campus. I believe what I do is valuable because I get to help people understand new knowledge and hopefully do well in their classes, while making new friends.

Are you a CUAA student interested in connecting with a tutor or another available resource provided by the ARC? Contact Earl Schumake at Earl.Schumake@cuaa.edu or visit the ARC within the Zimmerman Library to get started!

Want to learn more? Here are five things you may not have known about the ARC and this is a list of the top study spots on campus.

— Allie Milot ('21) is a student writer majoring in digital media design. Questions or concerns related to this article may be directed to news@cuaa.edu.

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